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Projects in Sierra Leone
For education and sustainable organic agriculture we nowadays focus on projects in Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, D.R. Congo, Guinea, Liberia, Mali, Niger, Sierra Leone, and Togo.
For more informatie see our application procedures.

Sierra Leone About 6 million people live in Sierra Leone. Freetown is the capital. English is the official language. Sierra Leone is predominantly a Muslim country with an influential Christian minority.
Sierra Leone has begun to recover from a decade of devastating civil war which ended in 2002. Ernest Bai Koroma was elected President in 2007. Read more...
Economy: Sierra Leone ranks among the poorest countries in the world, with a 2011 per capita GDP of only $486. The country is recovering from a decade of civil war (1991-2002). About two-thirds of the population engages in subsistence agriculture, which accounts for over half of the national income. Sierra Leone has large natural diamond and metal resources, and is also home to the third largest natural harbour in the world. Even so, 70% of its people live in poverty.
Health: Life expectancy at birth is 48 years, among the lowest in the world. Infant mortality is among the highest in the world. The country suffers from epidemic outbreaks of diseases such as yellow fever, cholera, Lassa fever and meningitis. Over 7% of the population is deemed to suffer from severe post-war stress.
Education: Only 42% of the population of Sierra Leone can read and write. Although 9 years of education is legally required for all children, a shortage of schools and teachers makes implementation of this law impossible. The shortages are partly due to civil war (1992-2002) which resulted in the destruction of almost 1,300 schools. Adults average less than 3 years of schooling. At the end of the Civil War, only about one third of school-age children went to school. Primary school enrolment has since doubled, and many schools have been reconstructed. Also, teacher training colleges are found in many parts of the country.
Nature: There is a lot of land degradation in Sierra Leone because of unsustainable agriculture, poor soil and water management practices, deforestation, fuel-wood consumption and (to a lesser extent) overgrazing and urbanization. Deforestation (both for commercial timber and to make room for agriculture) is a major concern. Mining and slash-and-burn for land conversion (for farming and cattle grazing) has dramatically diminished forested land in Sierra Leone since the 1980s. Recent years has also seen illegal fishing significantly deplete fish stocks. The situation is particularly serious as fishing provides the only source of income and survival for many communities.
Action on Poverty

ONDERWIJS Apprenticeships programme for women in Kenema, 2018-2020
The British NGO Action on Poverty specifically focuses on creating jobs for disadvantaged groups in Sri Lanka and four... more
Street Child

ONDERWIJS "Right to Learn", Kono, Kallahun and Kenema, 2018-2021
The British NGO Street Child started in 2008 with a small project for 100 street children in Sierra Leone. Street Child has... more
Christian Aid DRC

ONDERWIJS Vocational training for 250 young people, Kono district, 2016-2018
Chistian Aid has been working in Sierra Leone for more than 20 years with a local team of 24 people and local... more
Action on Poverty

ONDERWIJS Vocational skills development and income generation for youth, 2016-2018
Action on Poverty (APT) is a British NGO that aims to create employment for disadvantaged groups in five... more
Tools To Work

ONDERWIJS Strengthening of three vocational education institutions, 2016-2018
Since 1987 the Dutch organisation Tools to Work has been providing vocational education institutions and novice... more
Tools for Self Reliance

ONDERWIJS Sustainable livelihood for 150 unemployed youth in Bo City, 2016-2017
Tools for Self Reliance is a British organisation whose purpose is to increase employment in Africa by... more
Action Aid Sierra Leone

ONDERWIJS Enhancing Quality Education in three rural primary schools, Kono district, 2014-2016
Action Aid is an international development organisation that aims to improve access to and... more
Street Child

ONDERWIJS Teacher Training Rural Primary Education, Tambakha, 2014-2016
Street Child is dedicated to make quality education available for the most vulnerable children in Sierra Leone, and so... more
Plan Nederland

ONDERWIJS Access to quality education in Kailahun District, 2013-2015
In Sierra Leone, the number of children receiving an education is extremely low, and especially girls are often not going... more
Our focus:: Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, D.R. Congo, Guinea, Liberia, Mali, Niger, Sierra Leone, Togo
Also see other countries...

Recent history of Sierra Leone
    Sierra Leone became independent from the United Kingdom in 1961. Thriving for a while on diamond and metal mining, economic growth slowed in the 1970s and 1980s because of declines in the mining sector and increasing corruption among government officials. Corruption thrived under President Momoh, elected in 1985 as the only candidate in a one-party system. A rebellion against his government started 11 years of devastating Civil War. Blood diamonds paid for the weapons that fuelled the atrocities of the civil war. It left more than 50,000 people dead, and two million people displaced into neighbouring countries as refugees. It also destroyed most of the country's infrastructure and economy.
    Since UN peacekeeping forces helped end hostilities in 2002, Sierra Leone has begun to recover with massive international assistance. Ernest Bai Koroma was elected President in 2007 after a tense run-off election over the incumbent Vice President Berewa.


Project details

Action on Poverty Apprenticeships programme for women in Kenema, Sierra Leone, 2018-2020
The British NGO Action on Poverty specifically focuses on creating jobs for disadvantaged groups in Sri Lanka and four African countries, including Sierra Leone. The Turing Foundation already supported one of its projects in Sierra Leone in the period 2016-2017, which gave a total of 1,200 young people vocational training. Up to now all the graduates have been able to find work, either as an employee or self-employed. This project involves a new group of 200 women selected from a total target group of 3,500 for adult education. For one to one-and-a-half years they get practical lessons from an entrepreneur and then work there or start their own company. The entrepreneurs learn how to provide good training places for this group and for afterwards. Community Based Organisations learn how to bring this training to entrepreneurs.

The Turing Foundation is contributing €60,000 towards this project (of which, €14,000 in 2018)

See also:
      Action on Poverty: other projects
      Other teacher training projects
      Other vocational training projects

Apprenticeships program for women in Kenema, Sierra Leone, 2018-2020
Apprenticeships program for women in Kenema, Sierra Leone, 2018-2020



Street Child "Right to Learn", Kono, Kallahun and Kenema, Sierra Leone, 2018-2021
The British NGO Street Child started in 2008 with a small project for 100 street children in Sierra Leone. Street Child has now reached more than 100,000 children in Africa and Asia with its 'Education, Protection and Methodology' programmes. Together with its local partner Street Child of Sierra Leone, Street Child wants to use this project to improve the quality of education for 7,000 pupils at 35 schools and ensure that 1,400 pupils complete their final examinations every year. The 'Distant Learning' programme is giving a total of 50 unqualified teachers official training and recognition as teachers. Three senior teachers at each school receive extra training on the curriculum and general teaching skills. Pupils are given school materials and a classroom is being renovated. Initiatives are also being started to generate an income for the schools.

The Turing Foundation is contributing €100,000 towards this project (of which, €37,000 in 2018).

See also:
      Street Child: other projects
      Other building projects
      Other teacher training projects

'Right to Learn', Kono, Kallahun and Kenema, Sierra Leone
"Right to Learn", Kono, Kallahun and Kenema, Sierra Leone



Christian Aid DRC Vocational training for 250 young people, Kono district, Sierra Leone, 2016-2018
Chistian Aid has been working in Sierra Leone for more than 20 years with a local team of 24 people and local organisations like the national NGO Network Movement for Justice and Development (NMJD). The organisations have a similar approach: they enable people to improve their own situation.

This project will enable 250 young adults in Kono district to receive vocational training. They will be given a training place of their choice at existing workshops in Gbense, Tankoro and Fiama. Practitioners at these workshops are being taught training techniques. This project enables young people to develop a sustainable occupation and offers them an alternative to insecure and deplorable work in mines.

The Turing Foundation is donating € 75,000 to this project (about 50% of the total budget).

See also:
      Christian Aid DRC: other projects
      Other teacher training projects
      Other vocational training projects

Vocational training for 250 young people, Kono district, Sierra Leone, 2016-2018
Vocational training for 250 young people, Kono district, Sierra Leone, 2016-2018



Action on Poverty Vocational skills development and income generation for youth, Sierra Leone, 2016-2018
Action on Poverty (APT) is a British NGO that aims to create employment for disadvantaged groups in five countries, including Sierra Leone. APT is supporting the local organisation Movement for Assistance and Promotion of Rural Communities (MAPCO) in providing 240 young people with vocational training. MAPCO supplies local craftsmen with the materials and tools with which to teach their work to an average of ten young people. Trained members of community based organisations (CBOs) give young people business training courses, teach literacy when necessary, and provide access to credit through funds managed by the CBOs. This increases these young people's chances of a sustainable livelihood.

The Turing Foundation is contributing €96,000 towards this project, earmarked for the vocational training courses, of which €50,000 in 2017.

See also:
      Action on Poverty: other projects
      Other vocational training projects

Vocational skills development and income generation for youth, Sierra Leone
Vocational skills development and income generation for youth, Sierra Leone



Tools To Work Strengthening of three vocational education institutions, Sierra Leone, 2016-2018
Since 1987 the Dutch organisation Tools to Work has been providing vocational education institutions and novice entrepreneurs in developing countries with reconditioned tools and machinery. This teaches young adults a practical trade which gives them a greater opportunity to make their own living. Three vocational training institutions in Sierra Leone are each receiving a container with the sewing machines, computers, tools, printers, and machines they requested. In addition, sixteen teachers are being trained to repair and maintain sewing machines. This knowledge transfer will contribute towards the sustainability of the initiative.

The Turing Foundation is contributing €37,000 towards this project, of which, €8,000 in 2017.

See also:
      Tools To Work: other projects
      Other vocational training projects

Strengthening three vocational training facilities, Sierra Leone
Strengthening three vocational training facilities, Sierra Leone



Tools for Self Reliance Sustainable livelihood for 150 unemployed youth in Bo City, Sierra Leone, 2016-2017
Tools for Self Reliance is a British organisation whose purpose is to increase employment in Africa by providing young people with a training course and a starter kit of refurbished tools. The organisation has been working in Sierra Leone for a long time with the local organisation Craftshare, which has its own training centre. 150 young people in Bo City are being given a one-year vocational training course in one of eight selected occupations. After the training course all alumni are given a starter kit so they can begin right away in their field of expertise.

The Turing Foundation is contributing €19,500 (85% of the budget) to make this project possible, of which, €10,000 in 2017.

See also: Other vocational training projects

Tailoring Trainees, Sierra Leone
Tailoring Trainees, Sierra Leone



Action Aid Sierra Leone Enhancing Quality Education in three rural primary schools, Kono district, Sierra Leone, 2014-2016
Action Aid is an international development organisation that aims to improve access to and quality of education because it believes this as a fundamental human right. It operates in 45 countries, including Sierra Leone. In Sierra Leone Action Aid is improving the quality of education for 850 children at three primary schools by training teachers in better teaching techniques with better teaching materials. School management is also being improved using trainings and by strengthening its position in relation to educational authorities. Girls are disadvantaged and often unsafe in and around school, which is being addressed by raising awareness on radio shows, organising specific workshops and setting up girls' clubs.

The Turing Foundation is contributing € 95,000 to make this project possible (of which, € 20,000 in 2016).

See also: Other teacher training projects

Girls in front of the new Junior Secondary School, constructed with the support of ActionAid. Kono District, Sierra Leone
Girls in front of the new Junior Secondary School, constructed with the support of ActionAid. Kono District, Sierra Leone



Street Child Teacher Training Rural Primary Education, Tambakha, Sierra Leone, 2014-2016
Street Child is dedicated to make quality education available for the most vulnerable children in Sierra Leone, and so far they have reached 20,000 children in 30 locations throughout the country already. By training 100 teachers and building 20 basic educational facilities in 60 communities in the northern region of Tambakha, the foundation will reach 4,000 children. The teacher trainee programme/course takes three years to complete, and leads to a government qualification.

The Turing Foundation contributes € 90,000 (25% of the total budget).

See also:
      Street Child: other projects
      Other teacher training projects

Teacher Training Rural Primary Education, Tambakha, Sierra Leone
Teacher Training Rural Primary Education, Tambakha, Sierra Leone



Plan Nederland Access to quality education in Kailahun District, Sierra Leone, 2013-2015
In Sierra Leone, the number of children receiving an education is extremely low, and especially girls are often not going to school at all. This research project set up by Plan Nederland will allow 1,500 children to receive quality education. One of the express goals of the project is to realize a 50% participation level for girls. The project consists of the building of a school, and trainings for 50 teachers, 75 government employees, and the school management. On top of that, parent committees will be founded, and the project will be creating local awareness on the importance of the education of children and girls in particular.

The Turing Foundation will be donating € 145,000 towards the realization of quality education for 1,500 children (€ 45,000 in 2015).

See also:
      Other building projects
      Other teacher training projects

Access to quality education in Kailahun District, Sierra Leone
Access to quality education in Kailahun District, Sierra Leone




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