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Projects in Indonesia Indonesia
Wetlands International

NATURE Unlocking knowledge on mangrove recovery, Guinea Bissau, Tanzania, Indonesia, Philippines, 2019-2023
Wetlands International is the global not-for-profit organisation dedicated to... more
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

LEPROSY ENLIST Randomised controlled trials of methotrexate in Erythema Nodosum Leprosum, 2016-2025
Erythema Nodosum Leprosum (ENL) is a serious and very painful leprosy complication. It is... more
IOCRL

LEPROSY MetLep Trial: Metformin as adjunct therapy for MB leprosy, 2020-2024
Metformin is a cheap and safe medicine which has been used to treat diabetes for a long time. Research into... more
TENLEP research consortium

LEPROSY Research on treatment of early neuropathy in leprosy 2014-2017
The TENLEP Research Consortium (Treatment of Early Neuropathy in Leprosy) is a large international association in... more
Wereld Natuur Fonds

NATURE Protecting Endangered Turtles, Coral Triangle, 2012
Six out of the seven species of sea turtles we have on this earth live in the Coral Triangle. The animals are threatened most by... more
Wereld Natuur Fonds

NATURE Sustainable Finance for Networks of Marine Protected Areas, Coral Triangle, 2012
The World Wildlife Federation has established a foundation for the identification and management... more
Wereld Natuur Fonds

NATURE Live Reef Fish Trade Transformation, Coral Triangle, 2012
This World Wildlife Federation programme intends to achieve a recovery of the diverse fish population in the Coral... more
Wereld Natuur Fonds

NATURE Carbon footprint reduction and Protection of Critical Reefs, Coral triangle, 2012
We're approaching the final phase of our support of the Coral Triangle Initiative through the World... more
Wereld Natuur Fonds

NATURE Seafood Savers Platform for Sustainable Tuna and Live Reef Fish, Coral Triangle, 2012
We're approaching the final phase of our support of the Coral Triangle Initiativethrough the... more
Wereld Natuur Fonds

NATURE Responding to Climate Change through reduction of Tourism and travel footprint, Coral Triangle, 2007-2011
Global warming is bad for coral reefs - the corals will bleach, lose all... more
Wereld Natuur Fonds

NATURE Managing Tuna nurseries and bycatch, Coral Triangle, 2007-2011
Tuna fishing yields food and income for tens of millions of people living in the Coral Triangle. Besides, tuna plays a... more
Wereld Natuur Fonds

NATURE €3.000.000 for the Coral Triangle Initiative 2007-2012
There is no place on earth that is home to such great biodiversity as the coral triangle. The Turing Foundation contributes € 3,000,000 to... more
Zicht op Toekomst

EDUCATION Construction and equipment of a primary school with teacher accommodation in Idi, Atjeh, 2007
De Stichting Zicht Op Toekomst richt zich op scholenbouw in IndonesiŽ, in gebieden waar de infrastructuur verwoest is. In Atjeh, waar de tsunami van 2002... more
Peduli Anak

EDUCATION Construction and equipment of a school for street children, Lombok, 2007
De stichting Peduli Anak bouwt drie opvanghuizen en een school voor straatkinderen op het eiland Lombok in IndonesiŽ. 144 straatkinderen... more
Also see:: Bangladesh, Benin, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Cameroon, D.R. Congo, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea Bissau, India, Indonesia, Kenya, Liberia, Madagascar, Mali, Mozambique, Nepal, Netherlands, Niger, Papua, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Sierra Leone, Spain, Tanzania, Togo
Also see country overview...
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Project details

Wetlands International Unlocking knowledge on mangrove recovery, Guinea Bissau, Tanzania, Indonesia, Philippines, 2019-2023
Wetlands International is the global not-for-profit organisation dedicated to the conservation and restoration of wetlands, their resources and biodiversity. Wetlands International is one of the five founders of the Global Mangrove Alliance and aims to improve knowledge sharing about effective mangrove restoration. It is working with international, national and local partners on best practices, starting in Guinea Bissau, Tanzania, Indonesia and the Philippines. With these best practices they are helping governments create good mangrove policy at landscape level. This will be followed by developing a communication strategy to mobilise the global mangrove community, which will ultimately contribute towards more effective restoration of 30,000 hectares of mangrove area in ten countries.

The Turing Foundation is contributing € 300,000 towards this project (of which € 30,000 in 2023).

See also:
      Wetlands International: other projects
      Other projects in Tanzania
      Other projects in Guinea Bissau
      Other projects in Philippines
      Other mangrove projects

Passing on knowledge about mangrove restoration, Guinea-Bissau, Tanzania, Indonesia and the Philippines
Passing on knowledge about mangrove restoration, Guinea-Bissau, Tanzania, Indonesia and the Philippines



London School of Hygiene and Tropical MedicineLeprosy Research Initiative ENLIST Randomised controlled trials of methotrexate in Erythema Nodosum Leprosum, 2016-2025
Erythema Nodosum Leprosum (ENL) is a serious and very painful leprosy complication. It is often chronic and causes serious morbidity, not only affecting the skin but also bones, joints, eyes, nerves, testes, and kidneys. Effective treatment for ENL is available but expensive, has considerable side-effects, and is often inaccessible in many countries where leprosy is endemic. Methotrexate is cheap and has been used all over the world to treat conditions like psoriasis since the 1950s. This medicine is possibly an effective alternative to prednisolone (the most widely used corticosteroid treatment for ENL). The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine will validate this by inviting patients with ENL in Bangladesh, Brazil, Ethiopia, India, Indonesia, Nepal and the Philippines to take part in a study where some patients are prescribed methotrexate, and others prednisolone.

The Turing Foundation is contributing €350,000 towards this research (€25.000 in 2023).

See also:
      Leprosy Research Initiative: other projects
      Other projects in Brazil
      Other projects in Ethiopia
      Other projects in India
      Other projects in Bangladesh
      Other projects in Nepal
      Other projects in Philippines

Randomised controlled trials of methotrexate in Erythema Nodosum Leprosum
Randomised controlled trials of methotrexate in Erythema Nodosum Leprosum



IOCRLUniversity of DiponegoroLeprosy Research Initiative MetLep Trial: Metformin as adjunct therapy for MB leprosy, 2020-2024
Metformin is a cheap and safe medicine which has been used to treat diabetes for a long time. Research into tuberculosis patients, which is caused by a bacterium similar to leprosy, has demonstrated that metformin has a beneficial effect on the immune system. The IOCRL (Universities of Indonesia and Oxford Clinical Research Laboratory) is investigating the extent to which treatment of leprosy with metformin can reduce the degree and severity of leprosy reactions and prevent its consequences. The research is being conducted in Indonesia.

The Turing Foundation is contributing € 100,000 towards this project (of which, € 22,000 in 2023).

See also:
      Leprosy Research Initiative: other projects
      Other projects in Netherlands

M. Leprae bacterie
M. Leprae bacterie



TENLEP research consortium Research on treatment of early neuropathy in leprosy 2014-2017
The TENLEP Research Consortium (Treatment of Early Neuropathy in Leprosy) is a large international association in which 14 researchers from renowned research institutes all over the world work together, combining their expertise in the field of leprosy-related inflammation of the nerves.

TENLEP Trial is a large-scale research project focussing on nerve damage caused by leprosy. Its central research questions are: 1. To what extent can treatment of sub-clinical nerve damage reduce the number of patients with permanent nerve function impairments?
2. What is the most effective treatment for patients who have a clinical nerve function impairments?
A random double blind research method was designed to find the answers to these questions, including two integrated trials. In these trials, a corticosteroid treatment of sub-clinical nerve damage will be tested (during sixteen weeks and six months). Dependent on the type of nerve damage, patients will participate in one of the two trials. Subsequently, all patients will be categorized randomly into a group getting treatment and a group receiving a placebo. The effect of the leprosy treatment will be measured within 6, 12, and 18 months after it has started. Various advanced electronic devices, measuring factors such as nerve conductivity and sense of temperature, will be used to monitor the effect of treatment as meticulously as possible. Apart from that, the measuring will be done by means of an activity scale. A comparison between the results of the groups getting either treatment or a placebo must make clear which type of treatment reduces the risk of permanent nerve damage as much as possible. The research will be conducted in the Netherlands, England and the largest leprosy endemic countries (Indonesia, India, the Philippines, Bangladesh, Brasil and Ethiopia).

The Turing Foundation contributes € 742,847 to this research project (approx. 50% of the total research budget).

See also:
      Other projects in India
      Other projects in Bangladesh
      Other projects in Philippines
      Other projects in Brazil
      Other projects in Ethiopia

Scanning Electron Microscopy of M. leprae
Scanning Electron Microscopy of M. leprae



Wereld Natuur Fonds Protecting Endangered Turtles, Coral Triangle, 2012
Six out of the seven species of sea turtles we have on this earth live in the Coral Triangle. The animals are threatened most by the accidental bycatch of fishermen and by the loss of breeding habitat along the coasts. These majestic animals do not only play a principle role in the tourist industry; they also have an important symbolic meaning in initiatives and fundraising related to the protection of the Coral Triangle.

The main purpose of this World Wildlife Federation project is to make certain that half of all migration routes, feeding areas and breeding habitats of sea turtles have a protected status by 2011. Moreover, WWF intends to halve the fishery bycatch of turtles, for example by distributing more than 300,000 circle hooks among the fisher fleet for the prevention of bycatch.

The Turing Foundation will contribute € 250,000 to this project.

See also:
      The Coral Triangle Initiative
      Donation for Coral Protection (EZNC)
  Dr. Lida Pet Soede over het Coral Triangle Initiative (Television)
      The Coral Triangle Initiative (WWF website)
      Wereld Natuur Fonds: other projects
      Other projects in Philippines
      Other projects in Papua New Guinea

Protecting Endangered Turtles
Protecting Endangered Turtles



Wereld Natuur Fonds Sustainable Finance for Networks of Marine Protected Areas, Coral Triangle, 2012
The World Wildlife Federation has established a foundation for the identification and management of protected marine areas in the Coral Triangle, which consist of 50,000 km2 of coral reefs, 50,000 km2 of mangrove forests, and breeding grounds and migration routes of important fish species in 500,000 km2 of open water.

The foundation helps to bridge budget gaps, until the local governments have their financial situations in order. The foundation is also able to offer immediate help should there be urgent needs in the protected areas.

The Turing Foundation contributes € 600,000 to this foundation.

See also:
      The Coral Triangle Initiative
      Donation for Coral Protection (EZNC)
  Dr. Lida Pet Soede over het Coral Triangle Initiative (Television)
      The Coral Triangle Initiative (WWF website)
      Wereld Natuur Fonds: other projects
      Other projects in Philippines
      Other projects in Papua New Guinea
      Other mangrove projects

A 1.5 metre Napoleon fish. These special coral fish are captured alive and then kept in the aquaria of very chic restaurants. Sometimes ten thousand square metres of coral are poisoned by cyanide to stun just one fish, after which the divers haul the stunned animal up between the coral into a mobile aquarium.
A 1.5 metre Napoleon fish. These special coral fish are captured alive and then kept in the aquaria of very chic restaurants. Sometimes ten thousand square metres of coral are poisoned by cyanide to stun just one fish, after which the divers haul the stunned animal up between the coral into a mobile aquarium.



Wereld Natuur Fonds Live Reef Fish Trade Transformation, Coral Triangle, 2012
This World Wildlife Federation programme intends to achieve a recovery of the diverse fish population in the Coral Triangle, and a reduction of destructive fishing methods (such as dynamite fishing). One of the actions is the establishment of a Trade Association in the fishing industry (especially in Hong Kong) to promote sensible trade in the species of fish concerned. Simultaneously, plans will be made to encourage consumers to buy only fish that has been MSC certified.

The Turing Foundation will contribute € 300,000 to the programme, which will run until 2012.

See also:
      The Coral Triangle Initiative
      Donation for Coral Protection (EZNC)
  Dr. Lida Pet Soede over het Coral Triangle Initiative (Television)
      The Coral Triangle Initiative (WWF website)
      Wereld Natuur Fonds: other projects
      Other projects in Philippines
      Other projects in Papua New Guinea

Analysis of Live Reef Fish Trade routes in the Coral Triangle
Analysis of Live Reef Fish Trade routes in the Coral Triangle



Wereld Natuur Fonds Carbon footprint reduction and Protection of Critical Reefs, Coral triangle, 2012
We're approaching the final phase of our support of the Coral Triangle Initiative through the World Wide Fund for Nature. One of the final projects concerns the CO2-reduction and preservation of critical coral reefs. Within the Coral Triangle, the creation of Marine Protected Areas is not developing fast enough for the urgent need for breeding areas for fish and other life forms inhabiting and surrounding the coral reefs. Especially 'no-take zones', areas in which a total fishing ban is in effect, are a long time coming, although nature-preservation results and fishermen's fish stock in neighbouring areas are spectacular. It's why we've decided to do an extra investment for the project's final phase.

In total, the Turing Foundation will be donating € 300,000 to this initiative.

See also:
      Wereld Natuur Fonds: other projects
      Other projects in Philippines
      Other projects in Papua New Guinea

Bleached Coral Reefs, Coral Triangle
Bleached Coral Reefs, Coral Triangle



Wereld Natuur Fonds Seafood Savers Platform for Sustainable Tuna and Live Reef Fish, Coral Triangle, 2012
We're approaching the final phase of our support of the Coral Triangle Initiativethrough the World Wide Fund for Nature. One of the final projects is the setting up of a platform for sustainable tuna fishing. The yet to be founded 'Seafood Savers Platform' will bring together all important players in the field: fisheries, buyers, and retailers. The project also wants to generate a greater demand for sustainable fish products from WWF's small-scale field projects.

In total, the Turing Foundation will be donating € 300,000 to this initiative.

See also:
  What's the problem with tuna fishing in the Coral Triangle? (YouTube)
      Wereld Natuur Fonds: other projects
      Other projects in Philippines
      Other projects in Papua New Guinea

Fishing with dynamite, Coral Triangle
Fishing with dynamite, Coral Triangle



Wereld Natuur Fonds Responding to Climate Change through reduction of Tourism and travel footprint, Coral Triangle, 2007-2011
Global warming is bad for coral reefs - the corals will bleach, lose all their colour and eventually die. This is at the expense of marine life; it will limit fishing opportunities and reduce opportunities for tourism (which is an important source of income and an important stimulus for the protection of the corals).

The World Wildlife Federation believes it is possible to help the coral reefs in the Coral Triangle by avoiding any further negative impact of climate change, by reducing other disturbing effects on their health (such as polluting industries, tourism and fishing).

The Turing Foundation will contribute € 600,000 to this initiative, which will run until 2011.

See also:
      The Coral Triangle Initiative
      Donation for Coral Protection (EZNC)
  Dr. Lida Pet Soede over het Coral Triangle Initiative (Television)
      The Coral Triangle Initiative (WWF website)
      Wereld Natuur Fonds: other projects
      Other projects in Philippines
      Other projects in Papua New Guinea

Responding to Climate Change through reduction of Tourism and travel footprint
Responding to Climate Change through reduction of Tourism and travel footprint



Wereld Natuur Fonds Managing Tuna nurseries and bycatch, Coral Triangle, 2007-2011
Tuna fishing yields food and income for tens of millions of people living in the Coral Triangle. Besides, tuna plays a crucial role in the ecology of the coral reefs.

The governments in the Coral Triangle acknowledge that their fishing areas can be continuous sources of food and income, as long as they are managed in the right way. Therefore, they have laid down laws for the sustainable use of these areas. However, structural overfishing has been taking place during the past twenty years.

The World Wildlife Federation, together with the business community and the government, will design strategies and solutions to prevent the loss of tuna production in the Coral Triangle. The Turing Foundation will donate € 650,000 to this initiative, which will run until 2011.

See also:
      The Coral Triangle Initiative
      Donation for Coral Protection (EZNC)
  Dr. Lida Pet Soede over het Coral Triangle Initiative (Television)
      The Coral Triangle Initiative (WWF website)
      Wereld Natuur Fonds: other projects
      Other projects in Philippines
      Other projects in Papua New Guinea

Managing Tuna nurseries and bycatch
Managing Tuna nurseries and bycatch



Wereld Natuur Fonds €3.000.000 for the Coral Triangle Initiative 2007-2012
No place on earth has such great biodiversity as the Coral Triangle. The triangle covers almost 6,000,000 km2 and stretches out as far as Indonesia, the Philippines, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, East Timor and Brunei Darussalam. The triangle is a true nursery of the sea, being the home of 75% of all coral species and of more than 3,000 different fish species.

The area is seriously threatened by a range of factors, such as overfishing, destructive fishing (for example by the use of dynamite and cyanide), global warming and pollution.

Here, the World Wildlife Federation is setting up one of its largest and most ambitious projects ever, which aims to introduce a new, long term model for the sustainable management of this wildlife area - before the combination of threatening factors will have left a permanent mark on it, and on the millions of households that depend on it.

The project requires a whole range of simultaneous initiatives that address the various threats. If organised in the proper way, the initiatives will reinforce each other. A specially formed Coral Triangle Team will coordinate the entire project, and will in the coming years revise the strategy if necessary - possibly by developing new initiatives.

The eventual purpose of this project is to save the nurseries of the Coral Triangle, which are of vital importance to the conservation of a healthy ecosystem in the oceans and along the coasts of the Coral Triangle.
The Coral Triangle

In the six years to come, the Turing Foundation contributes € 3,000,000 in total to the six sub-initiatives that are part of the first phase of the programme. These six initiatives are described below.

1. Sustainable Finance for Networks of Marine Protected Areas

A new foundation will be established for the identification and management of protected marine areas in the Coral Triangle, which consist of 50,000 km2 of coral reefs, 50,000 km2 of mangrove forests, and breeding grounds and migration routes of important fish species in 500,000 km2 of open water.

The foundation helps to bridge budget gaps, until the local governments have their financial situations in order. The foundation is also able to offer immediate help should there be urgent needs in the protected areas.

The Turing Foundation will contribute € 600,000 to this foundation.


A 1.5 metre Napoleon fish. These special coral fish are captured alive and then kept in the aquaria of very chic restaurants. Sometimes ten thousand square metres of coral are poisoned by cyanide to stun just one fish, after which the divers haul the stunned animal up between the coral into a mobile aquarium.

2. Managing Tuna nurseries and bycatch

Tuna fishing yields food and income for tens of millions of people living in the Coral Triangle. Besides, tuna plays a crucial role in the ecology of the coral reefs.

The governments in the Coral Triangle acknowledge that their fishing areas can be continuous sources of food and income, as long as they are managed in the right way. Therefore, they have laid down laws for the sustainable use of these areas. However, structural overfishing has been taking place during the past twenty years.

Together with the business community and the government strategies and solutions will have to be designed to prevent the loss of tuna production in the Coral Triangle. The Turing Foundation will donate € 650,000 to this sub-initiative, which will run until 2010.

3. Live Reef Fish Trade Transformation

This programme intends to achieve a recovery of the diverse fish population in the Coral Triangle, and a reduction of destructive fishing methods (such as dynamite fishing). One of the actions is the establishment of a Trade Association in the fishing industry (especially in Hong Kong) to promote sensible trade in the species of fish concerned. Simultaneously, plans will be made to encourage consumers to buy only fish that has been MSC certified.

Analysis of Live Reef Fisg Trade Routes in the Coral Triangle

The Turing Foundation will contribute € 300,000 to the LRFTT-programme, which will run until 2010.

4. Protecting Endangered Turtles

Six out of the seven species of sea turtles we have on this earth live in the Coral Triangle. The animals are threatened most by the accidental bycatch of fishermen and by the loss of breeding habitat along the coasts. These majestic animals do not only play a principle role in the tourist industry; they also have an important symbolic meaning in initiatives and fundraising related to the protection of the Coral Triangle.

The main purpose of this sub-project is to make certain that half of all migration routes, feeding areas and breeding habitats of sea turtles have a protected status by 2010. Moreover, WWF intends to halve the fishery bycatch of turtles, for example by distributing more than 300,000 circle hooks among the fisher fleet for the prevention of bycatch.

Sea turtle in the Coral Triangle

The Turing Foundation will contribute € 250,000 to this sub-project.

5. Responding to Climate Change through reduction of Tourism and travel footprint

Global warming is bad for coral reefs - the corals will bleach, lose all their colour and eventually die. This is at the expense of marine life; it will limit fishing opportunities and reduce opportunities for tourism (which is an important source of income and an important stimulus for the protection of the corals).

It is possible to help the coral reefs by avoiding any further negative impact of climate change, by reducing other disturbing effects on their health (such as polluting industries, tourism and fishing).

Coral reef

The Turing Foundation will contribute € 600,000 to this sub-initiative, which will run until 2010.

6. Other projects

The Coral Triangle Initiative is a dynamic programme. It can be expected that extra activities are needed in the years to come in order to guarantee the success of the total project. Extra budget is already being made available for such future activities.

The Turing Foundation subscribes to this realistic viewpoint and commits € 600,000 support to these currently unnamed sub-projects.

See also:
      Donation for Coral Protection (EZNC)
  Dr. Lida Pet Soede over het Coral Triangle Initiative (Television)
      The Coral Triangle Initiative (WWF website)
      Wereld Natuur Fonds: other projects
      Other projects in Philippines
      Other projects in Papua New Guinea



Zicht op Toekomst Construction and equipment of a primary school with teacher accommodation in Idi, Atjeh, 2007
The Z.O.T. Foundation carries out aid programmes in Indonesia. The organisation focuses especially on the construction of schools in areas where the infrastructure was destroyed - in Atjeh, for example, which is a region that suffered greatly from the 2002 tsunami and the military conflicts of the past few years.

The Turing Foundation contributes € 50,000 to the construction and equipment of Maasschool 2, a primary school and teachers' accommodation in Idi, Atjeh (Indonesia).

See also: Other building projects

Opening of the Maasschool in Atjeh, 30 August 2007
Opening of the Maasschool in Atjeh, 30 August 2007



Peduli Anak Construction and equipment of a school for street children, Lombok, Indonesia, 2007
The Peduli Anak Foundation is devoted to street children on the island of Lombok, Indonesia. The foundation plans to build three relief centres (for 40 children per house) and a school. The institute will able to house 144 (former) street children at the most. Apart from a reception centre for street children, approximately 50 primary and secondary jobs will be created after full implementation of the project.

The Turing Foundation takes care of the costs for the construction and equipment of the school (€ 25,000).

See also:
      Turing Foundation Donates School
      Other building projects

The new school in Lombok
The new school in Lombok




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